Cherish the Chesapeake: Ways to Help Preserve the Bay


Our mission isn’t just to provide you with delicious oysters shipped fresh to your door. We also want to do our part to help preserve and improve the invaluable Chesapeake bay watershed. Oyster farming brings much needed revenue to the area and the oysters themselves act as filters, helping to clean the bay’s water and improving the overall ecosystem for other wildlife.  As global warming, pollution and other factors continue to put more and more pressure onto this crucial watershed, it’s important we find ways to help.

Here are a few ways you can help protect the Chesapeake Bay:

Pick Up Trash

Litter is extremely damaging to the Chesapeake bay. In 2016, nearly 3.3 million pounds of trash were collected from the Chesapeake region. You can get involved by signing up for Clean the Bay Day, which usually takes place the first weekend in June or Project Clean Stream.

Plant a Tree

Trees improve air quality, trap water pollution and provide habitat for wildlife. There are several organizations around the Chesapeake watershed that host planting days. You can also plant trees on your own property. The best months to plant are April, May and October.

 

Support Wildlife

 

There are hundreds of species that depend on the Chesapeake Bay. You can support them by joining a wildlife organization, volunteering  and teaching. Organizations like the Wildlife Center of Virginia always need volunteers to care for sick and injured wildlife. 

If you don’t live in the Chesapeake Bay Area, you can still volunteer. Several organizations like City Wildlife in Washington D.C. track the migratory birds like ducks, which also have an impact on the Chesapeake Watershed.

 Teach Others

Something as simple as taking the time to explain to someone why they shouldn’t litter can have a huge impact. More than 3 million students live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Volunteering to help create meaningful outdoor experiences is a great way to help ensure that environmental stewardship is passed on generation to generation.

 No matter how you choose to help, you can be assured you’re having a direct impact on one of Virginia’s most important resources. The bay belongs to all of us, and together, we can work to help improve and protect the area for generations to come.